Introduction

The Office of Native American Affairs (ONAA), established in 1998, oversees the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation’s (ACHP’s) Native American initiatives. ONAA staff also works closely with the ACHP’s tribal/Native Hawaiian member to address critical issues brought to the ACHP by Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations (NHOs), and intertribal organizations.

The ACHP works hard to foster relationships with Indians and Native Hawaiians across the country.

Major Initiatives

The Office of Native American Affairs (ONAA), established in 1998, oversees the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation's (ACHP's) Native American initiatives. ONAA staff also works closely with the ACHP's tribal/Native Hawaiian member to address critical issues brought to the ACHP by Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations (NHOs), and intertribal organizations.

The ACHP encourages federal agencies, State Historic Preservation Officers, the historic preservation community, and the general public to become familiar with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. It is important because it expresses both the aspirations of indigenous peoples around the world and those of States in seeking to improve their relations with indigenous peoples.
In the Section 106 context, the term “sacred sites” is sometimes used as shorthand for historic properties of religious and cultural significance to Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. As with other kinds of properties, sacred sites must be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places in order to be considered in the Section 106 process.
In recognition that large scale historic properties of significance to Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations (NHOs) across the United States are increasingly threatened by development, the ACHP launched a Native American traditional cultural landscapes initiative and adopted an action plan in November 2011.

Interested in ACHP's Native Youth program?

Learn more about preservation as a potential career choice and making your voice heard in protecting your heritage.

Need Section 106 Consultation Assistance?

The Office of Native American Affairs has staff assigned to help Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations with various federal agencies.

Indian Tribes & Native Hawaiian Preservation Success Stories

The completed Cathlapotle Plankhouse

Cathlapotle

Ridgefield, Washington

The Columbia River Village of Cathlapotle teaches the present about the past.

READ MORE

Indian Tribe & Native Hawaiian Digital Library

The Section 106 Digital Library contains a wealth of information about the Section 106 Process. In the library you will find:

Section 106 Regulations
Guidance Documents
Agreement Documents
Frequently Asked Questions
Explanation Resources
Publications
The following digital library section contains great introductory information and general resources for the Section 106 Process.
  1. Publication
    Description of the publication.
  2. Publication
    The Office of Native American Affairs (ONAA) works with federal agencies, Indian tribes, and Native Hawaiian organizations to address critical consultation issues.
  3. Public Resources
    The ACHP has developed a set of recommendations for federal agencies, Indian tribes, and other Section 106 participants to address their issues and challenges.
  4. Public Resources
    The 1992 amendments to the National Historic Preservation Act recognized and expanded the role of Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations in the national preservation program. In response to these changes, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) revised its regulations to clarify their role in the Section 106 process.
  5. Public Resources
    A federal agency is allowed, in some circumstances, to delegate to its applicants the responsibility to initiate consultation pursuant to the regulations that implement Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), “Protection of Historic Properties” (36 CFR Part 800). The provision in Section 800.2(c)(4) of the regulations has been used frequently by federal agencies such as the Federal Communications Commission, the Surface Transportation Board, and the Department of Health and Human Services. Although federal agencies can delegate this responsibility without the involvement of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), inquiries are often made about the applicability of this authority regarding consultation with Indian tribes. This guidance clarifies the restrictions on the use of this provision regarding Section 106 consultation with Indian tribes